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Fernandez, L., Marco, S., (2014). Calibration transfer between e-noses Signal Processing and Communications Applications Conference (SIU) Signal Processing and Communications Applications Conference (SIU), 2014 22nd , IEEE (Trabzon, Turkey) , 650-653

Electronic nose is an instrument which is composed of gas sensor array and pattern recognition unit. It is generally used for classifying, identifying or quantifying the odors or volatile organic components for these commonly used devices, calibration transfer is an important issue because of differences in each instrument, sensor drift, changes in environmental conditions or background changes. Calibration transfer is a transfer of model between different instruments which have different conditions. In this study, calibration transfer is applied to the e-noses which have different temperature conditions. Also the results of the direct standardization, piecewise direct standardization and orthogonal signal correction which are different calibration methods were compared. The results of the piecewise direct standardization method are more successful than the other methods for the dataset which is used in this study.

Keywords: Calibration, Conferences, Electronic noses, Ethanol, Instruments, Signal processing, Standardization


Esquivel, Juan Pablo , Castellarnau, Marc , Senn, Tobias , Löchel, Bernd , Samitier, Josep , Sabaté, Neus , (2012). Fuel cell-powered microfluidic platform for lab-on-a-chip applications Lab on a Chip 12, (1), 74-79

The achievement of a higher degree of integration of components – especially micropumps and power sources – is a challenge currently being pursued to obtain portable and totally autonomous microfluidic devices. This paper presents the integration of a micro direct methanol fuel cell (mDMFC) in a microfluidic platform as a smart solution to provide both electrical and pumping power to a Lab-on-a-Chip system. In this system the electric power produced by the fuel cell is available to enable most of the functionalites required by the microfluidic chip, while the generated CO2 from the electrochemical reaction produces a pressure capable of pumping a liquid volume through a microchannel. The control of the fuel cell operating conditions allows regulation of the flow rate of a liquid sample through a microfluidic network. The relation between sample flow rate and the current generated by the fuel cell is practically linear, achieving values in the range of 4–18 mL min 1 while having an available power between 1–4 mW. This permits adjusting the desired flow rate for a given application by controlling the fuel cell output conditions and foresees a fully autonomous analytical Lab-on-a-Chip in which the same device would provide the electrical power to a detection module and at the same time use the CO2 pumping action to flow the required analytes through a particular microfluidic design.

Keywords: micro direct methanol fuel cell (mDMFC), Lab-on-a-chip (LOC), Microfluidic device