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by Keyword: Human-Computer Interaction


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Martinez-Hernandez, Uriel, Vouloutsi, Vasiliki, Mura, Anna, Mangan, Michael, Asada, Minoru, Prescott, T. J., Verschure, P., (2019). Biomimetic and Biohybrid Systems 8th International Conference, Living Machines 2019, Nara, Japan, July 9–12, 2019, Proceedings , Springer, Cham (Lausanne, Switzerland) 11556, 1-384

This book constitutes the proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Biomimetic and Biohybrid Systems, Living Machines 2019, held in Nara, Japan, in July 2019. The 26 full and 16 short papers presented in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 45 submissions. They deal with research on novel life-like technologies inspired by the scientific investigation of biological systems, biomimetics, and research that seeks to interface biological and artificial systems to create biohybrid systems.

Keywords: Artificial intelligence, Biomimetics, Computer architecture, Human robot interaction, Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Humanoid robot, Image processing, Learning algorithms, Mobile robots, Multipurpose robots, Neural networks, Quadruped robots, Reinforcement learning, Robot learning, Robotics, Robots, Sensor, Sensors, Swarm robotics, User interfaces


Blancas-Muñoz, M., Vouloutsi, Vasiliki, Zucca, R., Mura, Anna, Verschure, P., (2018). Hints vs distractions in intelligent tutoring systems: Looking for the proper type of help ARXIV Computer Science, (Human-Computer Interaction), 1-4

The kind of help a student receives during a task has been shown to play a significant role in their learning process. We designed an interaction scenario with a robotic tutor, in real-life settings based on an inquiry-based learning task. We aim to explore how learners' performance is affected by the various strategies of a robotic tutor. We explored two kinds of(presumable) help: hints (which were specific to the level or general to the task) or distractions (information not relevant to the task: either a joke or a curious fact). Our results suggest providing hints to the learner and distracting them with curious facts as more effective than distracting them with humour.

Keywords: Computer Science, Human-Computer Interaction