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by Keyword: Polysomnography


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Urra, O., Jané, R., (2014). New sleep transition indexes for describing altered sleep in SAHS IFMBE Proceedings XIII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing 2013 (ed. Roa Romero, Laura M.), Springer International Publishing (London, UK) 41, 1017-1020

Traditional Sleep Structure Indexes (TSSIs) are insufficient to identify patterns of altered sleep. TSSIs mainly account for absolute time measures, but different levels of state instability may lead to similar absolute time distribution. Therefore, sleep stability remains beyond the scope of TSSIs. However, recent studies suggest that sleep disorders may be rather influenced by a breakdown in the sleep-stage switching mechanisms. In this study, we propose a set of 11 Sleep Transition Indexes (STIs) that characterize sleep fragmentation and account for the state-stability governed by the ultradian, homeostatic and circadian rhythms. We demonstrate that most of the proposed STIs are potential markers of SAHS severity, while TSSIs are not. In addition, we provide a new framework to analyze sleep disorders from the direct perspective of sleep regulatory mechanisms. In particular, our results indicate that SAHS may be influenced by a dysregulation of homeostatic rhythms but not of ultradian or circadian rhythms.

Keywords: SAHS, Sleep Transitions, Sleep Structure, Polysomnography, Hypnogram


Morgenstern, C., Schwaibold, M., Randerath, W., Bolz, A., Jané, R., (2010). Automatic non-invasive differentiation of obstructive and central hypopneas with nasal airflow compared to esophageal pressure Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC) 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE , IEEE (Buenos Aires, Argentina) , 6142-6145

The differentiation of obstructive and central respiratory events is a major challenge in the diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing. Esophageal pressure (Pes) measurement is the gold-standard method to identify these events but its invasiveness deters its usage in clinical routine. Flattening patterns appear in the airflow signal during episodes of inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) and have been shown with invasive techniques to be useful to differentiate between central and obstructive hypopneas. In this study we present a new method for the automatic non-invasive differentiation of obstructive and central hypopneas solely with nasal airflow. An overall of 36 patients underwent full night polysomnography with systematic Pes recording and a total of 1069 hypopneas were manually scored by human experts to create a gold-standard annotation set. Features were automatically extracted from the nasal airflow signal to train and test our automatic classifier (Discriminant Analysis). Flattening patterns were non-invasively assessed in the airflow signal using spectral and time analysis. The automatic non-invasive classifier obtained a sensitivity of 0.71 and an accuracy of 0.69, similar to the results obtained with a manual non-invasive classification algorithm. Hence, flattening airflow patterns seem promising for the non-invasive differentiation of obstructive and central hypopneas.

Keywords: Practical, Experimental/ biomedical measurement, Feature extraction, Flow measurement, Medical disorders, Medical signal processing, Patient diagnosis, Pneumodynamics, Pressure measurement, Signal classification, Sleep, Spectral analysis/ automatic noninvasive differentiation, Obstructive hypopnea, Central hypopnea, Inspiratory flow limitation, Nasal airflow, Esophageal pressure, Polysomnography, Feature extraction, Discriminant analysis, Spectral analysis


Mesquita, J., Fiz, J. A., Solà, J., Morera, J., Jané, R., (2010). Regular and non regular snore features as markers of SAHS Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC) 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE , IEEE (Buenos Aires, Argentina) , 6138-6141

Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS) diagnosis is still done with an overnight multi-channel polysomnography. Several efforts are being made to study profoundly the snore mechanism and discover how it can provide an opportunity to diagnose the disease. This work introduces the concept of regular snores, defined as the ones produced in consecutive respiratory cycles, since they are produced in a regular way, without interruptions. We applied 2 thresholds (TH/sub adaptive/ and TH/sub median/) to the time interval between successive snores of 34 subjects in order to select regular snores from the whole all-night snore sequence. Afterwards, we studied the effectiveness that parameters, such as time interval between successive snores and the mean intensity of snores, have on distinguishing between different levels of SAHS severity (AHI (Apnea-Hypopnea Index)<5h/sup -1/, AHI<10 h/sup -1/, AHI<15h/sup -1/, AHI<30h/sup -1/). Results showed that TH/sub adaptive/ outperformed TH/sub median/ on selecting regular snores. Moreover, the outcome achieved with non-regular snores intensity features suggests that these carry key information on SAHS severity.

Keywords: Practical, Experimental/ acoustic signal processing, Bioacoustics, Biomedical measurement, Diseases, Feature extraction, Medical signal processing, Patient diagnosis, Pneumodynamics, Sleep/ nonregular snore features, SAHS markers, Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome, Overnight multichannel polysomnography, Snore mechanism


Estrada, L., Santamaria, J., Isetta, V., Iranzo, A., Navajas, D., Farre, R., (2010). Validation of an EEG-based algorithm for automatic detection of sleep onset in the multiple sleep latency test Proceedings of the World Congress on Engineering 2010 World Congress on Engineering 2010 , IAENG (International Association of Engineers) (London, UK) 1, 1-3

The Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) is a standard test to objectively evaluate patients with excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep onset latencies are determined by visual analysis, which is costly and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to implement and test a single automatic algorithm to detect the sleep onset in the MSLT on the basis of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. The designed algorithm computed the relative EEG spectral powers in the occipital area and detected the sleep onset corresponding to the intersection point between the lower and alpha frequencies. The algorithm performance was evaluated by comparing the sleep latencies computed automatically by the algorithm and by a sleep specialist using MSLT recordings from a total of 19 patients (95 naps). The mean difference in sleep latency between the two methods was 0.025 min and the limits of agreement were ± 2.46 min (Bland-Altman analysis). Moreover, the intra-class correlation coefficient showed a considerable inter-rater reliability (0.90). The algorithm accurately detected the sleep onset in the MSLT. The devised algorithm can be a useful tool to support and speed up the sleep specialist’s work in routine clinical MSLT assessment.

Keywords: Automatic Algorithm, Drowsiness, Electroencephalography, Multiple Sleep Latency Test, Polysomnography, Sleep onset