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by Keyword: Respiratory impedance


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Sellares, J., Acerbi, I., Loureiro, H., Dellaca, R. L., Ferrer, M., Torres, A., Navajas, D., Farre, R., (2009). Respiratory impedance during weaning from mechanical ventilation in a mixed population of critically ill patients British Journal of Anaesthesia , 103, (6), 828-832

Worsening of respiratory mechanics during a spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) has been traditionally associated with weaning failure, although this finding is based on studies with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients only. The aim of our study was to assess the course of respiratory impedance non-invasively measured by forced oscillation technique (FOT) during a successful and failed SBT in a mixed population. Thirty-four weaning trials were reported in 29 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients with different causes of initiation of ventilation. During the SBT, the patient was breathing through a conventional T-piece connected to the tracheal tube. FOT (5 Hz, +/- 1 cm H2O, 30 s) was applied at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min. Respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) were computed from pressure and flow measurements. The frequency to tidal volume ratio f/V-t was obtained from the flow signal. At the end of the trial, patients were divided into two groups: SBT success and failure. Mixed model analysis showed no significant differences in Rrs and Xrs over the course of the SBT, or between the success (n=16) and the failure (n=18) groups. In contrast, f/V-t was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in the failure group. Worsening of respiratory impedance measured by FOT is not a common finding during a failed SBT in a typically heterogeneous intensive care unit population of mechanically ventilated patients.

Keywords: Ventilation, High frequency oscillation, Ventilation, Mechanical, Ventilation, Respiratory impedance


Farre, R., Montserrat, J. M., Navajas, D., (2008). Assessment of upper airway mechanics during sleep Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology , 163, (1-3), 74-81

Obstructive sleep apnea, which is the most prevalent sleep breathing disorder, is characterized by recurrent episodes of upper airway collapse and reopening. However, the mechanical properties of the upper airway are not directly measured in routine polysomnography because only qualitative sensors (thermistors for flow and thoraco-abdominal bands for pressure) are used. This review focuses on two techniques that quantify upper airway obstruction during sleep. A Starling model of collapsible conduit allows us to interpret the mechanics of the upper airway by means of two parameters: the critical pressure (Pcrit) and the upstream resistance (Rup). A simple technique to measure Pcrit and Rup involves the application of different levels of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during sleep. The forced oscillation technique is another non-invasive procedure for quantifying upper airway impedance during the breathing cycle in sleep studies. The latest developments in these two methods allow them to be easily applied on a routine basis in order to more fully characterize upper airway mechanics in patients with sleep breathing disorders.

Keywords: Obstructive sleep apnea, Upper airway, Airway resistance, Critical pressure, Respiratory impedance