Publications

by Keyword: Detectors


By year:[ 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 ]

Palacio, F., Fonollosa, J., burgués, J., Gomez, J. M., Marco, S., (2020). Pulsed-temperature metal oxide gas sensors for microwatt power consumption IEEE Access 8, 70938-70946

Metal Oxide (MOX) gas sensors rely on chemical reactions that occur efficiently at high temperatures, resulting in too-demanding power requirements for certain applications. Operating the sensor under a Pulsed-Temperature Operation (PTO), by which the sensor heater is switched ON and OFF periodically, is a common practice to reduce the power consumption. However, the sensor performance is degraded as the OFF periods become larger. Other research works studied, generally, PTO schemes applying waveforms to the heater with time periods of seconds and duty cycles above 20%. Here, instead, we explore the behaviour of PTO sensors working under aggressive schemes, reaching power savings of 99% and beyond with respect to continuous heater stimulation. Using sensor sensitivity and the limit of detection, we evaluated four Ultra Low Power (ULP) sensors under different PTO schemes exposed to ammonia, ethylene, and acetaldehyde. Results show that it is possible to operate the sensors with total power consumption in the range of microwatts. Despite the aggressive power reduction, sensor sensitivity suffers only a moderate decline and the limit of detection may degrade up to a factor five. This is, however, gas-dependent and should be explored on a case-by-case basis since, for example, the same degradation has not been observed for ammonia. Finally, the run-in time, i.e., the time required to get a stable response immediately after switching on the sensor, increases when reducing the power consumption, from 10 minutes to values in the range of 10–20 hours for power consumptions smaller than 200 microwatts.

Keywords: Robot sensing systems, Temperature sensors, Heating systems, Gas detectors, Power demand, Sensitivity, Electronic nose, gas sensors, low-power operation, machine olfaction, pulsed-temperature operation, temperature modulation


Wang, S., Hu, Y., Burgués, J., Marco, S., Liu, S.-L., (2020). Prediction of gas concentration using gated recurrent neural networks 2nd IEEE International Conference on Artificial Intelligence Circuits and Systems (AICAS) , IEEE (Genova, Italy) , 178-182

Low-cost gas sensors allow for large-scale spatial monitoring of air quality in the environment. However they require calibration before deployment. Methods such as multivariate regression techniques have been applied towards sensor calibration. In this work, we propose instead, the use of deep learning methods, particularly, recurrent neural networks for predicting the gas concentrations based on the outputs of these sensors. This paper presents a first study of using Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) neural network models for gas concentration prediction. The GRU networks achieve on average, a 44.69% and a 25.17% RMSE improvement in concentration prediction on a gas dataset when compared with Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) models respectively. With the current advances in deep network hardware accelerators, these networks can be combined with the sensors for a compact embedded system suitable for edge applications.

Keywords: Robot sensing systems, Predictive models, Logic gates, Gas detectors, Training, Temperature measurement, Support vector machines


Burgués, J., Marco, S., (2019). Wind-independent estimation of gas source distance from transient features of metal oxide sensor signals IEEE Access 7, 140460-140469

The intermittency of the instantaneous concentration of a turbulent chemical plume is a fundamental cue for estimating the chemical source distance using chemical sensors. Such estimate is useful in applications such as environmental monitoring or localization of fugitive gas emissions by mobile robots or sensor networks. However, the inherent low-pass filtering of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors-typically used in odor-guided robots and dense sensor networks due to their low cost, weight and size-hinders the quantification of concentration intermittency. In this paper, we design a digital differentiator to invert the low-pass dynamics of the sensor response, thus obtaining a much faster signal from which the concentration intermittency can be effectively computed. Using a fast photo-ionization detector as a reference instrument, we demonstrate that the filtered signal is a good approximation of the instantaneous concentration in a real turbulent plume. We then extract transient features from the filtered signal-the so-called “bouts”-to predict the chemical source distance, focusing on the optimization of the filter parameters and the noise threshold to make the predictions robust against changing wind conditions. This represents an advantage over previous bout-based models which require wind measurements-typically taken with expensive and bulky anemometers-to produce accurate predictions. The proposed methodology is demonstrated in a wind tunnel scenario where a MOX sensor is placed at various distances downwind of an emitting chemical source and the wind speed varies in the range 10-34 cm/s. The results demonstrate that models optimized with our methodology can provide accurate source distance predictions at different wind speeds.

Keywords: Gas detectors, Chemical sensors, Signal processing, Machine learning, Time series analysis


Ferrer-Lluis, I., Castillo-Escario, Y., Montserrat, J. M., Jané, R., (2019). Automatic event detector from smartphone accelerometry: Pilot mHealth study for obstructive sleep apnea monitoring at home Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC) 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE , IEEE (Berlín, Germany) , 4990-4993

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder with a low diagnosis ratio, leaving many patients undiagnosed and untreated. In the last decades, accelerometry has been found to be a feasible solution to obtain respiratory activity and a potential tool to monitor OSA. On the other hand, many smartphone-based systems have already been developed to propose solutions for OSA monitoring and treatment. The objective of this work was to develop an automatic event detector based on smartphone accelerometry and pulse oximetry, and to assess its ability to detect thoracic movements. It was validated with a commercial OSA monitoring system at home. Results of this preliminary pilot study showed that the proposed event detector for accelerometry signals is a feasible tool to detect abnormal respiratory events, such as apneas and hypopneas, and has potential to be included in smartphone-based systems for OSA assessment.

Keywords: Sleep apnea, Detectors, Pulse oximetry, Monitoring, Manuals, Band-pass filters, Pulse oximeter


Castillo-Escario, Y., Ferrer-Lluis, I., Montserrat, J. M., Jané, R., (2019). Automatic silence events detector from smartphone audio aignals: A pilot mHealth system for sleep apnea monitoring at home Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC) 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE , IEEE (Berlín, Germany) , 4982-4985

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disease, but most patients remain undiagnosed and untreated. Recently, mHealth tools are being proposed to screen OSA patients at home. In this work, we analyzed full-night audio signals recorded with a smartphone microphone. Our objective was to develop an automatic detector to identify silence events (apneas or hypopneas) and compare its performance to a commercial portable system for OSA diagnosis (ApneaLink™, ResMed). To do that, we acquired signals from three subjects with both systems simultaneously. A sleep specialist marked the events on smartphone and ApneaLink signals. The automatic detector we developed, based on the sample entropy, identified silence events similarly than manual annotation. Compared to ApneaLink, it was very sensitive to apneas (detecting 86.2%) and presented an 83.4% positive predictive value, but it missed about half the hypopnea episodes. This suggests that during some hypopneas the flow reduction is not reflected in sound. Nevertheless, our detector accurately recognizes silence events, which can provide valuable respiratory information related to the disease. These preliminary results show that mHealth devices and simple microphones are promising non-invasive tools for personalized sleep disorders management at home.

Keywords: Detectors, Manuals, Sleep apnea, Microphones, Labeling, Hospitals