Publications

by Keyword: Ferrocene


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Pérez, Judit, Dulay, Samuel, Mir, M., Samitier, Josep, (2018). Molecular architecture for DNA wiring Biosensors and Bioelectronics 121, 54-61

Detection of the hybridisation events is of great importance in many different biotechnology applications such as diagnosis, computing, molecular bioelectronics, and among others. However, one important drawback is the low current of some redox reporters that limits their application. This paper demonstrates the powerful features of molecular wires, in particular the case of S-[4-[2-[4-(2-Phenylethynyl)phenyl]ethynyl]phenyl] thiol molecule and the key role that play the nanometric design of the capture probe linkers to achieve an efficient couple of the DNA complementary ferrocene label with the molecular wire for an effective electron transfer in co-immobilised self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for DNA hybridisation detection. In this article, the length of the linker capture probe was studied for electron transfer enhancement from the ferrocene-motifs of immobilised molecules towards the electrode surface to obtain higher kinetics in the presence of thiolated molecular wires. The use of the right couple of capture probe linker and molecular wire has found to be beneficial as it helps to amplify eightfold the signal obtained.

Keywords: DNA hybridisation, Bioelectronics, Electron transfer rate constant, Molecular wires, Electrochemistry, Ferrocene, Biosensor


Pla-Vilanova, P., Aragonès, A. C., Ciampi, S., Sanz, F., Darwish, N., Diez-Perez, I., (2015). The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes Nanotechnology 26, 381001

Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform.

Keywords: Ferrocene, Molecular electronics, Single-molecule electronics, Single-molecule junctions, Singlemolecule contacts, STM-break junction, Terminal alkyne