Publications

by Keyword: Space


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Santos-Pata, Diogo, Zucca, Riccardo, López-Carral, Héctor, Verschure, P., (2019). Modulating grid cell scale and intrinsic frequencies via slow high-threshold conductances: A simplified model Neural Networks 119, 66-73

Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) have known spatial periodic firing fields which provide a metric for the representation of self-location and path planning. The hexagonal tessellation pattern of grid cells scales up progressively along the MEC’s layer II dorsal-to-ventral axis. This scaling gradient has been hypothesized to originate either from inter-population synaptic dynamics as postulated by attractor networks, or from projected theta frequency waves to different axis levels, as in oscillatory models. Alternatively, cellular dynamics and specifically slow high-threshold conductances have been proposed to have an impact on the grid cell scale. To test the hypothesis that intrinsic hyperpolarization-activated cation currents account for both the scaled gradient and the oscillatory frequencies observed along the dorsal-to-ventral axis, we have modeled and analyzed data from a population of grid cells simulated with spiking neurons interacting through low-dimensional attractor dynamics. We observed that the intrinsic neuronal membrane properties of simulated cells were sufficient to induce an increase in grid scale and potentiate differences in the membrane potential oscillatory frequency. Overall, our results suggest that the after-spike dynamics of cation currents may play a major role in determining the grid cells’ scale and that oscillatory frequencies are a consequence of intrinsic cellular properties that are specific to different levels of the dorsal-to-ventral axis in the MEC layer II.

Keywords: Grid cells, Entorhinal, Hyperpolarization, Navigation, Space


Taghadomi-Saberi, S., Garcia, S. M., Masoumi, A. A., Sadeghi, M., Marco, S., (2018). Classification of bitter orange essential oils according to fruit ripening stage by untargeted chemical profiling and machine learning Sensors 18, (6), 1922

The quality and composition of bitter orange essential oils (EOs) strongly depend on the ripening stage of the citrus fruit. The concentration of volatile compounds and consequently its organoleptic perception varies. While this can be detected by trained humans, we propose an objective approach for assessing the bitter orange from the volatile composition of their EO. The method is based on the combined use of headspace gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) and artificial neural networks (ANN) for predictive modeling. Data obtained from the analysis of HS-GC-MS were preprocessed to select relevant peaks in the total ion chromatogram as input features for ANN. Results showed that key volatile compounds have enough predictive power to accurately classify the EO, according to their ripening stage for different applications. A sensitivity analysis detected the key compounds to identify the ripening stage. This study provides a novel strategy for the quality control of bitter orange EO without subjective methods.

Keywords: Bitter orange essential oil, Headspace gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, Artificial neural network, Foodomics, Chemometrics, Feature selection


Garreta, E., González, F., Montserrat, N., (2018). Studying kidney disease using tissue and genome engineering in human pluripotent stem cells Nephron 138, 48-59

Kidney morphogenesis and patterning have been extensively studied in animal models such as the mouse and zebrafish. These seminal studies have been key to define the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex multistep process. Based on this knowledge, the last 3 years have witnessed the development of a cohort of protocols allowing efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) towards defined kidney progenitor populations using two-dimensional (2D) culture systems or through generating organoids. Kidney organoids are three-dimensional (3D) kidney-like tissues, which are able to partially recapitulate kidney structure and function in vitro. The current possibility to combine state-of-the art tissue engineering with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated systems 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering provides an unprecedented opportunity for studying kidney disease with hPSCs. Recently, hPSCs with genetic mutations introduced through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering have shown to produce kidney organoids able to recapitulate phenotypes of polycystic kidney disease and glomerulopathies. This mini review provides an overview of the most recent advances in differentiation of hPSCs into kidney lineages, and the latest implementation of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in the organoid setting, as promising platforms to study human kidney development and disease.

Keywords: Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems 9, Disease modeling, Gene editing, Human pluripotent stem cells, Kidney genetics, Tissue engineering


Khalil, I. S. M., Magdanz, V., Sánchez, S., Schmidt, O. G., Misra, S., (2015). Precise localization and control of catalytic janus micromotors using weak magnetic fields International Journal of Advanced Robotic Systems , 12, (2), 1-7

We experimentally demonstrate the precise localization of spherical Pt-Silica Janus micromotors (diameter 5 μm) under the influence of controlled magnetic fields. First, we control the motion of the Janus micromotors in two-dimensional (2D) space. The control system achieves precise localization within an average region-of-convergence of 7 μm. Second, we show that these micromotors provide sufficient propulsion force, allowing them to overcome drag and gravitational forces and move both downwards and upwards. This propulsion is studied by moving the micromotors in three-dimensional (3D) space. The micromotors move downwards and upwards at average speeds of 19.1 μm/s and 9.8 μm/s, respectively. Moreover, our closed-loop control system achieves localization in 3D space within an average region-of-convergence of 6.3 μm in diameter. The precise motion control and localization of the Janus micromotors in 2D and 3D spaces provides broad possibilities for nanotechnology applications.

Keywords: 3D space, Localization, Magnetic control, Micromotors, Self-propulsion


Muñoz, J. J., Conte, V., Asadipour, N., Miodownik, M., (2013). A truss element for modelling reversible softening in living tissues Mechanics Research Communications , 49, 44-49

We resort to non-linear viscoelasticity to develop a truss element able to model reversible softening in lung epithelial tissues undergoing transient stretch. Such a Maxwell truss element is built by resorting to a three-noded element whose mid-node is kinematically constrained to remain on the line connecting the end-nodes. The whole mechanical system undergoes an additive decomposition of the strains along the truss direction where the total contribution of the mid-node is accounted for by using a null-space projection and static condensation techniques. Assembling of such line-elements in 3D networks allows us to model extended regions of living tissues as well as their anisotropies.

Keywords: Maxwell, Null-space, Reversible softening, Truss, Viscoelasticity


Morgenstern, R., Morgenstern, C., Jané, R., Lee, S. H., (2011). Usefulness of an expandable interbody spacer for the treatment of foraminal stenosis in extremely collapsed disks preliminary clinical experience with endoscopic posterolateral transforaminal approach Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques , 24, (8), 485-491

Study Design: Clinical series of patients with degenerative disk disease undergoing an endoscopic posterolateral transforaminal procedure that used a reaming foraminoplasty technique to enlarge the foramen coupled with insertion of the B-Twin expandable spacer. Objectives: This retrospective analysis of 107 consecutive patients sought to assess the outcome of this surgical procedure. Summary of Background Data: Reamed endoscopic foraminoplasty under direct endoscopic vision has been shown to be suitable for extremely collapsed disks (> 50% total disk height) despite the difficult access, especially at L5-S1. The authors tried to investigate the efficacy of an expandable spacer being inserted by the endoscopic transforaminal approach to solve foraminal stenosis without bone fusion techniques. Methods: The procedure consists of bone reaming under direct endoscopic control to wide the foramen followed by insertion of the B-Twin expandable device as a disk spacer to restore partially or to maintain the height of the collapsed disk. Outcome measures included visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for functional disability, and radioimaging studies. Results: Mean follow-up was 27.2 months. Clinical outcome was considered excellent in 64 patients, good in 25, fair in 10, and poor in 8. Results were similar in single and double B-Twin spacer insertions. Postoperative mean values for VAS and ODI scores improved significantly as compared with preoperative data. Mean VAS and ODI scores were significantly higher in patients with fair or poor results than in those with excellent or good outcome. In 2 cases, clear signs of end plate bone resorption in the control computed tomographic scans at 6 months and 12 months leading to a substantial loss of disk height were documented. Conclusions: This preliminary study has shown the efficacy of an endoscopic surgical technique for the treatment of foraminal stenosis in extremely collapsed disks.

Keywords: Foraminal stenosis, B-twin expandable spacer, Endoscopic foraminoplasty, Minimally invasive surgery, Surgical technique, Spinal spacer, Lumbar, Diskectomy, Fusion, Discectomy


Muñoz, Luis Miguel, Casals, Alícia, Amat, Josep, Puig-Vidal, Manel, Samitier, Josep, (2005). Improved AFM scanning methodology with adaptation to the target shape C3 - Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation ICRA 2005 2005 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation , IEEE (Barcelona, Spain) , 1529-1534

This paper presents a manipulation and measurement aid for tasks carried out in micro-nano environments operating with scanning AFM. In teleoperated manipulation or measurement over a given point of the target, where a slow and precise movement is necessary, the developed system increases the accuracy in this point producing a space deformation. In automatic scanning, the adjusted selection of the target, through assisted image segmentation, enables to reduce the working time.

Keywords: Assisted teleoperation, Image segmentation, Micro-nano manipulation, Workspace deformation