Staff member


Joan Montero Boronat

Senior Researcher
Nanobioengineering
jmontero@ibecbarcelona.eu
+34 934 039 956
Staff member publications

Montero, Joan, (2019). The attack of the “seeding” clones Science Translational Medicine 11, (483), eaax0872

Tumor clone tracking in breast cancer xenografts identifies a small subset of circulating tumor cells as “seeders” associated with metastasis.


Montero, Joan, Gstalder, Cécile, Kim, Daniel J., Sadowicz, Dorota, Miles, Wayne, Manos, Michael, Cidado, Justin R., Paul Secrist, J., Tron, Adriana E., Flaherty, Keith, Stephen Hodi, F., Yoon, Charles H., Letai, Anthony, Fisher, David E., Haq, Rizwan, (2019). Destabilization of NOXA mRNA as a common resistance mechanism to targeted therapies Nature Communications 10, (1), 5157

Most targeted cancer therapies fail to achieve complete tumor regressions or attain durable remissions. To understand why these treatments fail to induce robust cytotoxic responses despite appropriately targeting oncogenic drivers, here we systematically interrogated the dependence of cancer cells on the BCL-2 family of apoptotic proteins after drug treatment. We observe that multiple targeted therapies, including BRAF or EGFR inhibitors, rapidly deplete the pro-apoptotic factor NOXA, thus creating a dependence on the anti-apoptotic protein MCL-1. This adaptation requires a pathway leading to destabilization of the NOXA mRNA transcript. We find that interruption of this mechanism of anti-apoptotic adaptive resistance dramatically increases cytotoxic responses in cell lines and a murine melanoma model. These results identify NOXA mRNA destabilization/MCL-1 adaptation as a non-genomic mechanism that limits apoptotic responses, suggesting that sequencing of MCL-1 inhibitors with targeted therapies could overcome such widespread and clinically important resistance.

Keywords: Cancer therapeutic resistance, Melanoma, Targeted therapies


Park, D. E., Cheng, J., Berrios, C., Montero, J., Cortés-Cros, M., Ferretti, S., Arora, R., Tillgren, M. L., Gokhale, P. C., DeCaprio, J. A., (2019). Dual inhibition of MDM2 and MDM4 in virus-positive Merkel cell carcinoma enhances the p53 response Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116, (3), 1027-1032

Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) contributes to approximately 80% of all Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. MCV-positive MCC expresses small T antigen (ST) and a truncated form of large T antigen (LT) and usually contains wild-type p53 (TP53) and RB (RB1). In contrast, virus-negative MCC contains inactivating mutations in TP53 and RB1. While the MCV-truncated LT can bind and inhibit RB, it does not bind p53. We report here that MCV LT binds to RB, leading to increased levels of ARF, an inhibitor of MDM2, and activation of p53. However, coexpression of ST reduced p53 activation. MCV ST recruits the MYC homologue MYCL (L-Myc) to the EP400 chromatin remodeler complex and transactivates specific target genes. We observed that depletion of EP400 in MCV-positive MCC cell lines led to increased p53 target gene expression. We suspected that the MCV ST–MYCL–EP400 complex could functionally inactivate p53, but the underlying mechanism was not known. Integrated ChIP and RNA-sequencing analysis following EP400 depletion identified MDM2 as well as CK1α, an activator of MDM4, as target genes of the ST–MYCL–EP400 complex. In addition, MCV-positive MCC cells expressed high levels of MDM4. Combining MDM2 inhibitors with lenalidomide targeting CK1α or an MDM4 inhibitor caused synergistic activation of p53, leading to an apoptotic response in MCV-positive MCC cells and MCC-derived xenografts in mice. These results support dual targeting of MDM2 and MDM4 in virus-positive MCC and other p53 wild-type tumors.

Keywords: Casein kinase 1 alpha, Lenalidomide, MDM2-MDM4, Merkel cell carcinoma, P53


Montero, J., (2019). Dual oncogene excision is greater than the sum of its parts Science Translational Medicine 11, (491), eaax4876

Ablation of EGFR and c-RAF in combination is effective against aggressive pancreatic tumors.


Montero, J., (2019). Ingestible macromolecule injectors Science Translational Medicine 11, (515), eaaz3720

A next-generation ingestible device uses microneedles for macromolecule administration in the small intestine to avoid subcutaneous injections.


Montero, J., (2019). Modeling endometrial disease using organoids Science Translational Medicine 11, (507), eaaz0304

Organoids generated from patient-derived endometrial tissue model the pathophysiology of endometrial disease and can be used for drug screening.


Montero, J., (2019). P21: One protein to rule cell fate Science Translational Medicine 11, (499), eaay3568

Early p21 expression controls cells’ proliferation/senescence fate after chemotherapy.


Stover, Elizabeth H., Baco, Maria B., Cohen, Ofir, Li, Yvonne Y., Christie, Elizabeth L., Bagul, Mukta, Goodale, Amy, Lee, Yenarae, Pantel, Sasha, Rees, Matthew G., Wei, Guo, Presser, Adam G., Gelbard, Maya K., Zhang, Weiqun, Zervantonakis, Ioannis K., Bhola, Patrick D., Ryan, Jeremy, Guerriero, Jennifer L., Montero, Joan, Liang, Felice J., Cherniack, Andrew D., Piccioni, Federica, Matulonis, Ursula A., Bowtell, David D. L., Sarosiek, Kristopher A., Letai, Anthony, Garraway, Levi A., Johannessen, Cory M., Meyerson, Matthew, (2019). Pooled genomic screens identify anti-apoptotic genes as targetable mediators of chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer Molecular Cancer Research 17, (11), 2281-2293

High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is often sensitive to initial treatment with platinum and taxane combination chemotherapy, but most patients relapse with chemotherapy-resistant disease. To systematically identify genes modulating chemotherapy response, we performed pooled functional genomic screens in HGSOC cell lines treated with cisplatin, paclitaxel, or cisplatin plus paclitaxel. Genes in the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis were among the top candidate resistance genes in both gain-of-function and loss-of-function screens. In an open reading frame overexpression screen, followed by a mini-pool secondary screen, anti-apoptotic genes including BCL2L1 (BCL-XL) and BCL2L2 (BCL-W) were associated with chemotherapy resistance. In a CRISPR-Cas9 knockout screen, loss of BCL2L1 decreased cell survival whereas loss of proapoptotic genes promoted resistance. To dissect the role of individual anti-apoptotic proteins in HGSOC chemotherapy response, we evaluated overexpression or inhibition of BCL-2, BCL-XL, BCL-W, and MCL1 in HGSOC cell lines. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins decreased apoptosis and modestly increased cell viability upon cisplatin or paclitaxel treatment. Conversely, specific inhibitors of BCL-XL, MCL1, or BCL-XL/BCL-2, but not BCL-2 alone, enhanced cell death when combined with cisplatin or paclitaxel. Anti-apoptotic protein inhibitors also sensitized HGSOC cells to the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib. These unbiased screens highlight anti-apoptotic proteins as mediators of chemotherapy resistance in HGSOC, and support inhibition of BCL-XL and MCL1, alone or combined with chemotherapy or targeted agents, in treatment of primary and recurrent HGSOC.Implications: Anti-apoptotic proteins modulate drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and inhibitors of BCL-XL or MCL1 promote cell death in combination with chemotherapy.