Staff member


Silvia Muro

Group Leader / ICREA Research Professor
Targeted therapeutics and nanodevices
smuro@ibecbarcelona.eu
+34 934 020 440
Staff member publications

Roki, N., Tsinas, Z., Solomon, M., Bowers, J., Getts, R. C., Muro, S., (2019). Unprecedently high targeting specificity toward lung ICAM-1 using 3DNA nanocarriers Journal of Controlled Release 305, 41-49

DNA nanostructures hold great potential for drug delivery. However, their specific targeting is often compromised by recognition by scavenger receptors involved in clearance. In our previous study in cell culture, we showed targeting specificity of a 180 nm, 4-layer DNA-built nanocarrier called 3DNA coupled with antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a glycoprotein overexpressed in the lungs in many diseases. Here, we examined the biodistribution of various 3DNA formulations in mice. A formulation consisted of 3DNA whose outer-layer arms were hybridized to secondary antibody-oligonucleotide conjugates. Anchoring IgG on this formulation reduced circulation and kidney accumulation vs. non-anchored IgG, while increasing liver and spleen clearance, as expected for a nanocarrier. Anchoring anti-ICAM changed the biodistribution of this antibody similarly, yet this formulation specifically accumulated in the lungs, the main ICAM-1 target. Since lung targeting was modest (2-fold specificity index over IgG formulation), we pursued a second preparation involving direct hybridization of primary antibody-oligonucleotide conjugates to 3DNA. This formulation had prolonged stability in serum and showed a dramatic increase in lung distribution: the specificity index was 424-fold above a matching IgG formulation, 144-fold more specific than observed for PLGA nanoparticles of similar size, polydispersity, ζ-potential and antibody valency, and its lung accumulation increased with the number of anti-ICAM molecules per particle. Immunohistochemistry showed that anti-ICAM and 3DNA components colocalized in the lungs, specifically associating with endothelial markers, without apparent histological changes. The degree of in vivo targeting for anti-ICAM/3DNA-nanocarriers is unprecedented, for which this platform technology holds great potential to develop future therapeutic applications.

Keywords: 3DNA, DNA nanostructure, Drug nanocarrier, Endothelial and lung targeting, ICAM-1, In vivo biodistribution


Manthe, R. L., Rappaport, J. A., Long, Y., Solomon, M., Veluvolu, V., Hildreth, M., Gugutkov, D., Marugan, J., Zheng, W., Muro, S., (2019). δ-Tocopherol effect on endocytosis and its combination with enzyme replacement therapy for lysosomal disorders: A new type of drug interaction? Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 370, (3), 823-833

Induction of lysosomal exocytosis alleviates lysosomal storage of undigested metabolites in cell models of lysosomal disorders (LDs). However, whether this strategy affects other vesicular compartments, e.g., those involved in endocytosis, is unknown. This is important both to predict side effects and to use this strategy in combination with therapies that require endocytosis for intracellular delivery, such as lysosomal enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We investigated this using δ-tocopherol as a model previously shown to induce lysosomal exocytosis and cell models of type A Niemann-Pick disease, a LD characterized by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency and sphingomyelin storage. δ-Tocopherol and derivative CF3-T reduced net accumulation of fluid phase, ligands, and polymer particles via phagocytic, caveolae-, clathrin-, and cell adhesion molecule (CAM)-mediated pathways, yet the latter route was less affected due to receptor overexpression. In agreement, δ-tocopherol lowered uptake of recombinant ASM by deficient cells (known to occur via the clathrin pathway) and via targeting intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (associated to the CAM pathway). However, the net enzyme activity delivered and lysosomal storage attenuation were greater via the latter route. Data suggest stimulation of exocytosis by tocopherols is not specific of lysosomes and affects endocytic cargo. However, this effect was transient and became unnoticeable several hours after tocopherol removal. Therefore, induction of exocytosis in combination with therapies requiring endocytic uptake, such as ERT, may represent a new type of drug interaction, yet this strategy could be valuable if properly timed for minimal interference.


Muro, Silvia, (2018). Alterations in cellular processes involving vesicular trafficking and implications in drug delivery Biomimetics 3, (3), 19

Endocytosis and vesicular trafficking are cellular processes that regulate numerous functions required to sustain life. From a translational perspective, they offer avenues to improve the access of therapeutic drugs across cellular barriers that separate body compartments and into diseased cells. However, the fact that many factors have the potential to alter these routes, impacting our ability to effectively exploit them, is often overlooked. Altered vesicular transport may arise from the molecular defects underlying the pathological syndrome which we aim to treat, the activity of the drugs being used, or side effects derived from the drug carriers employed. In addition, most cellular models currently available do not properly reflect key physiological parameters of the biological environment in the body, hindering translational progress. This article offers a critical overview of these topics, discussing current achievements, limitations and future perspectives on the use of vesicular transport for drug delivery applications.

Keywords: Cellular vesicles, Vesicle fusion, Fission and intracellular trafficking, Drug delivery systems and nanomedicines, Transcytosis and endocytosis of drugs carriers, Disease effects on vesicular trafficking, Drug effects on vesicular trafficking, Role of the biological environment